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'Paedophilia is natural and normal for males'How some university academics make the case for paedophiles at summer conferences

The Telegraph

After the report into Jimmy Savile and the conviction of Rolf Harris, Britain has gone into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties

"Paedophilic interest is natural and normal for human males,” said the presentation. “At least a sizeable minority of normal males would like to have sex with children … Normal males are aroused by children.”

Some yellowing tract from the Seventies or early Eighties, era of abusive celebrities and the infamous PIE, the Paedophile Information Exchange? No. Anonymous commenters on some underground website? No again.

The statement that paedophilia is “natural and normal” was made not three decades ago but last July. It was made not in private but as one of the central claims of an academic presentation delivered, at the invitation of the organisers, to many of the key experts in the field at a conference held by the University of Cambridge. Other presentations included “Liberating the paedophile: a discursive analysis,” and “Danger and difference: the stakes of hebephilia.”

Hebephilia is the sexual preference for children in early puberty, typically 11 to 14-year-olds.

Another attendee, and enthusiastic participant from the floor, was one Tom O’Carroll, a multiple child sex offender, long-time campaigner for the legalisation of sex with children and former head of the Paedophile Information Exchange. “Wonderful!” he wrote on his blog afterwards. “It was a rare few days when I could feel relatively popular!”

Last week, after the conviction of Rolf Harris, the report into Jimmy Savile and claims of an establishment cover-up to protect a sex-offending minister in Margaret Thatcher’s Cabinet, Britain went into a convulsion of anxiety about child abuse in the Eighties. But unnoticed amid the furore is a much more current threat: attempts, right now, in parts of the academic establishment to push the boundaries on the acceptability of child sex.

Jimmy Savile exploited the trust of a nation for his own vile purposes

A key factor in what happened all those decades ago in the dressing rooms of the BBC, the wards of the NHS and, allegedly, the corridors of power was not just institutional failings or establishment “conspiracies”, but a climate of far greater intellectual tolerance of practices that horrify today.

With the Pill, the legalisation of homosexuality and shrinking taboos against premarital sex, the Seventies was an era of quite sudden sexual emancipation. Many liberals, of course, saw through PIE’s cynical rhetoric of “child lib”. But to others on the Left, sex by or with children was just another repressive boundary to be swept away – and some of the most important backing came from academia.

In 1981, a respectable publisher, Batsford, published Perspectives on Paedophilia, edited by Brian Taylor, a sociology lecturer at Sussex University, to challenge what Dr Taylor’s introduction called the “prejudice” against child sex. Disturbingly, the book was aimed at “social workers, community workers, probation officers and child care workers”.

The public, wrote Dr Taylor, “generally thinks of paedophiles as sick or evil men who lurk around school playgrounds in the hope of attempting unspecified beastliness with unsuspecting innocent children”. That, he reassured readers, was merely a “stereotype”, both “inaccurate and unhelpful”, which flew in the face of the “empirical realities of paedophile behaviour”. Why, most adult-child sexual relationships occurred in the family!

The perspectives of most, though not all, the contributors, appeared strongly pro-paedophile. At least two were members of PIE and at least one, Peter Righton, (who was, incredibly, director of education at the National Institute for Social Work) was later convicted of child sex crimes. But from the viewpoint of today, the fascinating thing about Perspectives on Paedophilia is that at least two of its contributors are still academically active and influential.

Prof Ken Plummer, left, and former PIE head Tom O'Carroll Ken Plummer is emeritus professor of sociology at Essex University, where he has an office and teaches courses, the most recent scheduled for last month. “The isolation, secrecy, guilt and anguish of many paedophiles,” he wrote in Perspectives on Paedophilia, “are not intrinsic to the phenomen[on] but are derived from the extreme social repression placed on minorities …

“Paedophiles are told they are the seducers and rapists of children; they know their experiences are often loving and tender ones. They are told that children are pure and innocent, devoid of sexuality; they know both from their own experiences of childhood and from the children they meet that this is not the case.”

As recently as 2012, Prof Plummer published on his personal blog a chapter he wrote in another book, Male Intergenerational Intimacy, in 1991. “As homosexuality has become slightly less open to sustained moral panic, the new pariah of 'child molester’ has become the latest folk devil,” he wrote. “Many adult paedophiles say that boys actively seek out sex partners … 'childhood’ itself is not a biological given but an historically produced social object.” Prof Plummer confirmed to The Sunday Telegraph that he had been a member of PIE in order to “facilitate” his research. He said: “I would never want any of my work to be used as a rationale for doing 'bad things’ – and I regard all coercive, abusive, exploitative sexuality as a 'bad thing’. I am sorry if it has impacted anyone negatively this way, or if it has encouraged this.” However, he did not answer when asked if he still held the views he expressed in the Eighties and Nineties. A spokesman for Essex University claimed Prof Plummer’s work “did not express support for paedophilia” and cited the university’s charter which gave academic staff “freedom within the law to put forward controversial and unpopular opinions without placing themselves in jeopardy”.

Graham Powell is one of the country’s most distinguished psychologists, a past president of the British Psychological Society and a current provider of psychology support services to the Serious Organised Crime Agency, the National Crime Squad, the Metropolitan Police, Kent Police, Essex Police and the Internet Watch Foundation. In Perspectives on Paedophilia, however, he co-authored a chapter which stated: “In the public mind, paedophile attention is generally assumed to be traumatic and to have lasting and wholly deleterious consequences for the victim. The evidence that we have considered here does not support this view … we need to ask not why are the effects of paedophile action so large, but why so small.”

The chapter does admit that there were “methodological problems” with the studies the authors relied on which “leave our conclusions somewhat muted”. Dr Powell told The Sunday Telegraph last week that “what I wrote was completely wrong and it is a matter of deep regret that it could in any way have made things more difficult [for victims]”. He said: “The literature [scientific evidence] was so poor in 1981, people just didn’t realise what was going on. There was a lack of understanding at the academic level.” Dr Powell said he had never been a member of PIE.

In other academic quarters, with rather fewer excuses, that lack of understanding appears to be reasserting itself. The Cambridge University conference, on July 4-5 last year, was about the classification of sexuality in the DSM, a standard international psychiatric manual used by the police and courts.

After a fierce battle in the American Psychiatric Association (APA), which produces it, a proposal to include hebephilia as a disorder in the new edition of the manual has been defeated. The proposal arose because puberty in children has started ever earlier in recent decades and as a result, it was argued, the current definition of paedophilia – pre-pubertal sexual attraction – missed out too many young people.

Ray Blanchard, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, who led the APA’s working group on the subject, said that unless some other way was found of encompassing hebephilia in the new manual, that was “tantamount to stating that the APA’s official position is that the sexual preference for early pubertal children is normal”.

Prof Blanchard was in turn criticised by a speaker at the Cambridge conference, Patrick Singy, of Union College, New York, who said hebephilia would be abused as a diagnosis to detain sex offenders as “mentally ill” under US “sexually violent predator” laws even after they had completed their sentences.

But perhaps the most controversial presentation of all was by Philip Tromovitch, a professor at Doshisha University in Japan, who stated in a presentation on the “prevalence of paedophilia” that the “majority of men are probably paedophiles and hebephiles” and that “paedophilic interest is normal and natural in human males”. O’Carroll, the former PIE leader, was thrilled, and described on his blog how he joined Prof Tromovitch and a colleague for drinks after the conference. “The conversation flowed most agreeably, along with the drinks and the beautiful River Cam,” he said.

It’s fair to say the Tromovitch view does not represent majority academic opinion. It’s likely, too, that some of the academic protests against the “stigmatisation” of paedophiles are as much a backlash against the harshness of sex offender laws as anything else. Finally, of course, academic inquiry is supposed to question conventional wisdom and to deal rigorously with the evidence, whether or not the conclusions it leads you to are popular. Even so, there really is now no shortage of evidence about the harm done by child abuse. In the latest frenzy about the crimes of the past, it’s worth watching whether we could, in the future, go back to the intellectual climate which allowed them.

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Angela Nagle: Roosh V falls foul of the online outrage cycle

Last week we were warned that a “pro-rape group” would be organising a pro-rape rally in Naas, Co Kildare, and several online petitions called on the Taoiseach to ban the meeting. But there is more to the story than reports suggested.

The controversial meetings were to take place in towns and cities around the world as part of the Return of Kings website’s call for an international meet-up day.

In other words, it was a small internet meet-up in Naas of an obscure forum to meet like-minded men and discuss anti-feminist politics and pick-up artistry, or as they like to call it “game”.

Or it would have been had it gone ahead. Soon after the meetings were announced the website’s creator cancelled them because of fear for the “safety” of his followers, presumably against female protesters and potential attackers.

The website’s creator, known as Roosh V, is an anti-feminist polemicist who has been the subject of petitions around the world seeking to ban him from entry to Canada, the UK and the US, each gathering tens of thousands of signatures.

He sees himself as part of a broader “neomasculinist” movement, which gained prominence within the men’s rights movement of the 1990s, reasserting a strong masculinity perceived to be under attack.

The Return of Kings website is part of a wider online constellation of anti-feminist “manosphere” subcultures and forums from pick-up artists to MGTOW (Men Going Their Own Way), which is made up of heterosexual men who rather unconvincingly claim to be voluntarily abstaining from relations with women.

Roosh wrote a book series called Bang, advising men on tactics to get women in different countries to sleep with them.

Political dimension

Roosh’s adventures had a political and economic dimension too, as he had a harder time impressing women in social-democratic feminist Denmark, for example, but claims to have had more luck in eastern Europe where women are, he creepily reports, more “traditional”, a virtue one might have expected to create a hurdle to the central project of Bang.

However, the “pro-rape rally” claim, repeated uncritically in headlines all over the world, deserves some analysis. It comes from a blog post written by Roosh called How to Stop Rape, in which he makes an absurd claim that making rape legal on private property will stop rape.

The pick-up artist has since repeatedly claimed that the piece was satire. What exactly it might be satirising is hard to deduce, but it is highly plausible that the failed satire wasn’t intended to be taken literally and Roosh V has repeated multiple times on Twitter and elsewhere that he does not advocate rape.

Disgusting views

One can easily argue against the sincerity of his claim, but why was this reported as a pro-rape rally, a claim now reported around the world as an objective fact, when it is an internet forum meet-up organised on the website of a man who, despite having disgusting views on women, is on record many times saying he does not actually advocate rape?

The increasingly predictable cycle of social media outrage, followed by mainstream media outrage, followed by petitioning of the State to enforce bans on speech and assembly also comes in the context of several years of ongoing online culture wars in which we have even seen feminists like Germaine Greer “no-platformed” on campuses by the new crop of younger feminists for offensive speech.

We’ve seen the language and politics of the new feminism used against left-wing pro-feminist candidates Bernie Sanders in the US and Jeremy Corbyn in the UK. The “Berniebro” myth, that smears Sanders fans as overwhelmingly male, sexist and macho internet trolls, became a source of further online flame wars, opinion and think pieces, despite the notable absence of evidence. The best way to have dealt with Return of Kings’ squalid little internet meet-ups would have been to mock, ignore or challenge them instead of calling on the State to intervene.

Incitement laws

In the context of the current immigration and refugee crisis, are progressives really going to legitimise the banning of foreign men on the basis of their opinions? And if so, who do we think will get to decide what constitutes a harmful opinion?

Given how widespread incitement to violence laws are, the way in which the press uncritically took its cue from social media outrage on the Roosh V issue should be worrying to us all, especially in the new online media economy, where outrage generates clicks. Today it may be a sexist fool with retrograde opinions but eventually the fact-immune outrage cycle may come for you too.

Angela Nagle is a writer and academic researcher

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Porn, prostitution will be rampant if women allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia: Report

Toronto Sun

Allowing women to drive in Saudi Arabia would cause rampant sex, porn and homosexuality, according to some of the country's scholars.

Academics at the country's highest religious council submitted a report to the legislative assembly warning of the dangers of letting women behind the wheel, reports the Daily Telegraph.

If the only country in the world that still bans women from driving were to change its rules, there would be "a surge in prostitution, pornography, homosexuality and divorce."

Within 10 years of the ban being lifted, the report claimed, there would be "no more virgins" in the country, according to the paper.

Currently, women caught driving in the kingdom may be lashed as punishment.

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